Woodley Park-Adams Morgan-Zoo

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Woodley Park-Adams Morgan-Zoo metro escalator in the District of Columbia. When I lived in Adams Morgan, I erroneously believed that the escalator was the longest in the Western Hemisphere, but apparently that honor actually belongs to the metro station at Forest Glen.

Annaberg windmill

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The empty shell of a windmill at the Annaberg sugar plantation on St. John in the US Virgin Islands.
If there was a steady breeze, sugar cane was brought to the windmill. Revolving sails–which have long since disappeared from this windmill–turned a central shaft, rotating the rollers and crushing the sugar cane stalks. Juice ran down the rollers into the gutter and flowed downhill to the factory for processing. 300-500 gallons of juice could be produced in an hour.

George Washington

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Clark Mills’ equestrian statue of George Washington at the battle of Princeton. According to the National Parks Service, Congress appropriated $50,000 for the statue in 1853, which was finally dedicated on 22 February 1860. It stands in Washington Circle, near the George Washington University.

Fort Willoughby

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Fort Willoughby on Hassel Island, United States Virgin Islands. Fort Willoughby on the southern tip of the island. The Danes originally had a battery here to protect the harbor entrance. When the British seized the islands during the Napoleonic Wars, they built this fort here to replace the Danish battery. The British eventually gave the territory back to the Danes in 1815.

Cinnamon Bay

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A Danish warehouse on the beach at Cinnamon Bay, St. John. The woman inside told me it was built in the 1840s and was used for legitimate purposes to house rum and sugar and, at one time, to store illegal goods.
Today you can rent snorkels and dive gear here.